Business & Heritage Clarksville
Local News, Business, Arts, Heritage – DAILY Serving the Clarksville, TN region.


 
 

 

Behind bans and challenges: sex, language, drugs and religion

The Harry Potter books and the Twilight series are often targeted for their "ungodly" content (i.e. witchcraft, werewolves etc), with challengers failing to note the heroic qualities displayed by those characters, including loy...
by News Staff
 

 
 

“A Streetcar Named Desire” banned for “steamy sexuality”

The sexual content of Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire," which later became a popular and critically acclaimed film, raised eyebrows and led to self-censorship when the film version was being made.
by News Staff
 

 

 

The Lovely Bones: a view from heaven

Alice Sebold's The Lovely Bones is the story of a teenage girl who, after being raped and murdered, watches from her personal Heaven as her family and friends struggle to move on with their lives while she comes to terms with h...
by News Staff
 

 
 

“Invisible Man” deals with “black nationalism”

"Invisible Man" addresses many of the social and intellectual issues facing African-Americans early in the twentieth century, including black nationalism, the relationship between black identity and Marxism, and the reformist r...
by News Staff
 

 
 

Once banned, “Leaves of Grass” is now a “must read”

Whitman spent his entire life writing Leaves of Grass, revising it in several editions until his death. Among the poems in the collection are "Song of Myself", "I Sing the Body Electric", "Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking", ...
by News Staff
 

 

 

“Gatsby” remains great despite hundreds of challenges

Fitzgerald, inspired by the parties he had attended while visiting Long Island's north shore, began planning "The Great Gatsby" in 1923 desiring to produce, in his words, "something new—something extraordinary and beautiful a...
by News Staff
 

 
 

John Steinbeck’s “The Grapes of Wrath” endures 60 years of “banning”

When preparing to write "The Grapes of Wrath," Steinbeck wrote: "I want to put a tag of shame on the greedy bastards who are responsible for this [the Great Depression and its effects]."
by News Staff
 

 




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